Friday, June 15, 2012

Leaders Must Deliver On Their Promises



Leaders Must Deliver On Their Promises

Is it just me, or are you also sick and tired of campaigning politicians continuously making promises that they have no intention of keeping, or even worse, have no intention of even trying to keep? If so, how can we explain why these individuals keep doing so, and voters keep casting their votes largely based on the promises? It really becomes frustrating when even after they are elected, they still fail to act on the promises made to constituents, and often take actions contradictory to their promises. Is it any wonder that so many have become disgusted with the political process, and that there is so much apathy? Denis Waitley put it this way, "Promises should not be lightly given unless we want them to be lightly received."
1. In my well over thirty years of professionally identifying, qualifying, and consulting to thousands of leaders, as well as serving several times as a leader both in the corporate and the not- for- profit environments, I have come to firmly believe that unless someone commits to absolute integrity, it is impossible to truly be a leader. Great leaders need the support of, and the belief in by, their constituents, supporters and donors. If rather than striving to keep one's promises, and showing demonstrable progress towards delivering on promises, constituents and others become disillusioned with the individual who fails to keep (or breaks) his promises. It is far better to under- promise and over- deliver than it is to make empty promises. Leaders should never simply make a promise, unless they also have studied the issues, and have developed a realistic, well thought out and designed course of action.
2. When was the last time you followed a leader who actually kept his promises? One of the major causes for the great challenges faced by many organizations today is that in these often challenging times, there is so much competition for people's time, resources, energies and commitments. Therefore, when constituents and potential followers begin to think of someone in leadership as just another empty suit, and doubt both the person's integrity and motivations, true leadership then becomes nearly impossible. Without absolute integrity, no one can long remain a leader. We must ask why so many who want to be in leadership spend so much time being a politician, even after they are elected, and so little time being a statesman.
Rule number one for sincere leaders must be to stop making empty promises, and spend more time serving as a leader by seeking viable solutions and courses of action.
With over 30 years consultative sales, marketing, training, managerial, and operations experience, Richard Brody has trained sales and marketing people in numerous industries, given hundreds of seminars, appeared as company spokesperson on over 200 radio and television programs. He's negotiated, arranged and organized hundreds of events.
Richard's owned businesses, been a COO, CEO, and Director of Development, as well as a consultant. His company Website is http://www.plan2lead.net, and he can be followed on Twitter @rgbrody. For great information on many topics, visit PLAN2LEAD's Facebook page and LIKE ( http://www.facebook.com/Plan2lead )